Cut to the Bone – Alex Caan

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One Missing Girl. Two Million Suspects.

Ruby is a vlogger, a rising star of YouTube and a heroine to millions of teenage girls.

And she’s missing…

But she’s an adult – the police aren’t too worried.

Until the video’s uploaded…

Ruby, in the dirt, pleading for her life.

Enter Detective Inspector Kate Riley; the Met’s rising star and the head of a new team of investigators with the best resources money can buy. Among them, Detective Sergeant Zain Harris, the poster boy for multiracial policing. But can Kate wholly trust him – and more importantly, can she trust herself around him?

As hysteria builds amongst the press and Ruby’s millions of fans, Kate and her team are under pressure to get results, and fast, but as they soon discover, the world of YouTube vloggers and social media is much darker than anyone could have imagined.

And the videos keep coming…

Enter the strange and murky world of the vloggers. I’ve got more than a passing familiarity with it, given my daughter’s fascination with YouTube and the parade of celebrity vloggers with millions of followers whose lives we follow. Oh, I admit it, I’m just as much of a fan of YouTube, and as you’ve probably guessed, am rather fond of the world of social media. Happily my experience of it is rather less sinister than Ruby’s…

It’s Ruby’s disappearance takes centre stage in the drama which unfolds and the cast of characters who inhabit her world, but the key (and more interesting) dynamic is that between DI Kate Riley and DS Zain Harris. Both are fascinating in their own ways, and both have their secrets. Riley has moved across the world to start again in the UK, and Harris has his own troubled past.

Cut to the Bone is a dark and atmospheric police procedural with a modern twist. It’s a fast-paced read and a classic page-turner. Just one more page, just one more chapter, where will the fickle finger of suspicion alight next?

You can find Alex on twitter at @alexcaanwriter or at www.alexcaanauthor.com

Many thanks to Emily at Bonnier Zaffre for the advance copy.

1,342 QI Facts to leave you flabbergasted – a guest post by Literary QI ELF Anne Miller

Today I’m delighted to take part in the blog tour for 1,342 QI Facts To Leave You Flabbergasted by John Lloyd, John Mitchinson, James Harkin and Anne Miller.

Today we’ve got Anne Miller here to tell us about how she became the chief Literary QI Elf.

Without further ado, over to Anne!

I did a Sociology and Politics degree and spent a lot of time on extra curricular activities – one year I ran the campus magazine, another year the university tango dancing society. When I graduated I was lucky enough to win a place on the Edinburgh TV Festival’s talent scheme The Network. (It’s fantastic – if you’re interested in working in TV you should definitely look them up!) We had a wonderfully busy weekend of going to workshops and talks from people like Jay Hunt, who runs Channel 4, and Charlie Brooker about how the TV industry works.

I worked in various TV jobs and then met the team at QI when I had a day shadowing on the QI set all the way back in Series I. They said to stay in touch and I emailed in a fact that I saw on the wall of the Dundee Science Centre that said ‘an eagle can swallow enough botulism toxin to kill 300,000 guinea pigs.’ They liked the fact and said that if I sent them more they might employ me. I like a challenge so sent more facts and a few months later I joined an internship scheme at QI and began helping out on the Twitter feed (@qikipedia) and organising their databases.

That was five years ago and now I write scripts for the TV series, am the Head Researcher for our sister BBC Radio 4 show The Museum of Curiosity and have just co-authored our new book 1,342 QI Facts To Leave You Flabbergasted. My favourite facts from the new book include:

  • In the time it takes to listen to The Proclaimers’ ‘I’m Gonna Be (500 Miles)’, the ISS travels 500 miles, then 500 more.
  • Until the 1950s,
the rural poor in Norway warmed their feet
 in cowpats.
  • Hans Christian Andersen wrecked his friendship with Charles Dickens by staying with him three weeks longer than planned.
  • The Pieza genus of fly has species called Pieza kake, Pieza pie, Pieza rhea
and Pieza deresistans.
  • During the launch of BBC2 in 1964, a kangaroo got stuck in a lift
at Television Centre.
  • In 2016,
the Swiss city of Lausanne banned silent discos for being too noisy.

Thanks Anne! I do love a quite interesting fact…

1,342 QI Facts To Leave You Flabbergasted is out now at Amazon and Waterstones.

The blog tour continues…
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Deep Down Dead – Steph Broadribb

Deep down dead - steph broadribb

Lori Anderson is as tough as they come, managing to keep her career as a fearless Florida bounty hunter separate from her role as single mother to nine-year-old Dakota, who suffers from leukaemia. But when the hospital bills start to rack up, she has no choice but to take her daughter along on a job that will make her a fast buck. And that’s when things start to go wrong. The fugitive she’s assigned to haul back to court is none other than JT, Lori’s former mentor – the man who taught her everything she knows … the man who also knows the secrets of her murky past.

Not only is JT fighting a child exploitation racket operating out of one of Florida’s biggest theme parks, Winter Wonderland, a place where ‘bad things never happen’, but he’s also mixed up with the powerful Miami Mob. With two fearsome foes on their tails, just three days to get JT back to Florida, and her daughter to protect, Lori has her work cut out for her. When they’re ambushed at a gas station, the stakes go from high to stratospheric, and things become personal.

If I have one thing to say about Steph Broadribb’s Deep Down Dead, it’d be this: Go read it.

Featuring a kick-ass heroine, Deep Down Dead is a helter-skelter thrill ride pretty much from the off. Lori is unusual in many ways, but mostly because she’s that rarity in thriller books: she’s *interesting*. So often in thrillers you get these cookie-cutter characters, seen one, seem them all. I’ve never seen anyone quite like Lori though.

It’s a cat and mouse game all the way, when what appears to be a simple job goes south in a spectacular fashion. I love nothing more than a good thriller, and Steph has delivered a *great* thriller, steeped in Americana with settings and characters which feel completely authentic and with a plot which insists that you don’t put it down. I read this on holiday recently and found myself staying up entirely too late to read just one more chapter. I can’t wait to see what she comes up with next.

Deep Down Dead by Steph Broadribb (@crimethrillgirl) is out now from Orenda Books. You can find out more on Steph’s website, crimethrillergirl.com

The Exiled – Kati Hiekkapelto

The Exiled - Kati Hiekkapelto

Murder. Corruption. Dark secrets. A titanic wave of refugees. Can Anna solve a terrifying case that’s become personal?

Anna Fekete returns to the Balkan village of her birth for a relaxing summer holiday. But when her purse is stolen and the thief is found dead on the banks of the river, Anna is pulled into a murder case. Her investigation leads straight to her own family, to closely guarded secrets concealing a horrendous travesty of justice that threatens them all. As layer after layer of corruption, deceit and guilt are revealed, Anna is caught up in the refugee crisis spreading like wildfire across Europe. How long will it take before everything explodes?

The Exiled is the third of Kati Hiekkapelto’s books featuring detective Anna Fekete. This time she’s headed home to a little Balkan village to visit her family when her bag is snatched whilst on an evening out with her friends. She finds herself ensnared in a mystery which goes much further than a simple robbery.

It feels strange to be part of a blog tour for a Finnish author, but to be reading about the stifling heat of summertime in Kanizsa, a town in northern Serbia.

Anna herself is a fascinating character, adrift in her home town in the summer heat, a long way from Finland. The exiled is a very topical tale as the influx of refugees on their way to Europe makes its mark on the little town, bringing murder and corruption and even on holiday, Anna can’t escape her instincts to find out what’s really going on.

Kati Hiekkapelto has a great knack with characterisation, and the story  flows at a gentle pace, much like the river which plays such a central part of the story. Anna’s investigations take their toll on friendships and family, but you’re always on her side, willing her to uncover the truth, no matter how hard it might be to hear.

You can find Kati Hiekkapelto on twitter @HiekkapeltoKati or at her website, katihiekkapelto.com

Many thanks, as always, to Karen from Orenda Books for the review copy. Opinions are, of course, my own.

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The Mine – Antti Tuomainen

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In the dead of winter, investigative reporter Janne Vuori sets out to uncover the truth about a mining company, whose illegal activities have created an environmental disaster in a small town in Northern Finland. When the company’s executives begin to die in a string of mysterious accidents, and Janne’s personal life starts to unravel, past meets present in a catastrophic series of events that could cost him his life. A traumatic story of family, a study in corruption, and a shocking reminder that secrets from the past can return to haunt us, with deadly results.

Well, another corker from Karen Sullivan at Orenda Books – regular readers of this blog will be under no illusions that I am huge and unashamed fan of this publisher. She has a phenomenal eye for a story.

The Mine is no exception. Part crime story, part conspiracy, with a dash of mystery thrown in for good measure. It’s a splendid concoction of beautifully evocative locations and compelling characters. Can Janne get to the bottom of the mysterious goings-on at the Mine before it’s too late?

I really liked the way the story played out with Janne’s investigation contrasting with the killer at work (and some deliciously horrible scenes there!). Definitely a page-turner that’ll keep you up into the wee small hours, though it’s a pretty quick read so not *too* many late nights!

You can check out a Q&A with Antti Tuomainen over at Lucy Hay’s blog. Antti can also be found on Facebook (you can like  his page here) and he’s also on Twitter @antti_tuomainen and Instagram@anttituomainen, or his website at www.anttituomainen.com.

Many thanks, as always, to Karen from Orenda Books for the review copy. Opinions are, of course, my own.

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First Monday Crime – spotlight on Belinda Bauer

Next Monday (November 7th), Goldsboro Books First Monday Crime is taking place at the Library Club in London from 6.30 to 7.30pm. The lineup includes Belinda Bauer, Cathi Unsworth, Jenny Blackhurst, Adam Hamdy and event chair, Barry Forshaw.

Tickets for the event are a bargain at only a fiver. I wish I lived a bit nearer as this sounds like a great night. You can get your tickets here. Sponsored by Headline, it promises to be a brilliant event!

I’ve read and loved Belinda’s previous book, The Facts of Life and Death and her new book The Beautiful Dead is out on 17th November.

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There’s no safety in numbers…

Eve Singer needs death. With her career as a TV crime reporter flagging, she’ll do anything to satisfy her ghoulish audience.

The killer needs death too. He even advertises his macabre public performances, where he hopes to show the whole world the beauty of dying.

When he contacts Eve, she welcomes the chance to be first with the news from every gory scene. Until she realizes that the killer has two obsessions.

One is public murder.

And the other one is her…

First Monday Crime is on November 7th from 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm
LIBRARY, 112 St. Martin’s Lane, London, WC2N 4BD

You can follow First Monday Crime twitter @1stMondayCrime

Revenger – Alastair Reynolds

Revenger - Alastair Reynolds

The galaxy has seen great empires rise and fall. Planets have shattered and been remade. Amongst the ruins of alien civilisations, building our own from the rubble, humanity still thrives.

And there are vast fortunes to be made, if you know where to find them…

Captain Rackamore and his crew do. It’s their business to find the tiny, enigmatic worlds which have been hidden away, booby-trapped, surrounded with layers of protection – and to crack them open for the ancient relics and barely-remembered technologies inside. But while they ply their risky trade with integrity, not everyone is so scrupulous.

Adrana and Fura Ness are the newest members of Rackamore’s crew, signed on to save their family from bankruptcy. Only Rackamore has enemies, and there might be more waiting for them in space than adventure and fortune: the fabled and feared Bosa Sennen in particular.

Revenger is a science fiction adventure story set in the rubble of our solar system in the dark, distant future – a tale of space pirates, buried treasure and phantom weapons, of unspeakable hazards and single-minded heroism… and of vengeance…

If I had to sum up Revenger, I’d have to go with something like ‘Firefly meets Iain M. Banks’. I think that’s a fair assessment, and if you’re a fan of either, I think you’ll enjoy this book.

Those are easy comparisons though – the swashbuckling pirate adventure of a small ship and crew against a starry backdrop with enough hard SF to appease the most ardent fan. There are hijinks galore, treasure chests hidden in far-flung nooks, daring adventures and more than a touch of the high seas.

Fura Ness makes for a fine and fiery protagonist with a lovely depth to her story, the world-building is absolutely first rate and some of the most fascinating I’ve read in a long time, and the supporting cast of characters is splendid.

There’s a real YA feel to the story, given the age of Fura and her sister, though some of the coming of age angst and rebelling against tyrannical father-knows-best was perhaps the weakest part of the book for me.

Revenger is splendid fun. Easily one of the best sci-fi novels I’ve read for a long time, and I really hope we get to meet Fura Ness again.

Many thanks to Gollancz and Netgalley for the advance copy for review. Opinions, as always, my own